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University of Wyoming

» Floristics

Floristics Projects: Colorado


Select a project from the map or list below:

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  1. Colorado, South-central: San Isabel and Rio Grande National Forests. This represents the thesis project by Brian A. Elliott. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. The area encompassed the Wet and Sangre de Cristo Mountains and the Culebra Range (Alamosa, Chaffee, Costilla, Custer, Fremont, Huerfano, Las Animas, Pueblo, and Saguache counties) for a total of over 5,000 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,700 to 14,294 feet. Collected were 20,585 specimens documenting 1,393 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 44 documented at 145 sites. Also vouchered were 134 exotics including 30 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the San Isabel National Forest, John Marr Fund, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematic Botany), and the University of Wyoming.
  2. Arapaho National Forest and Grand County, Colorado. This represents a thesis project by Erin K. Foley. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2003 and 2004. The area encompassed the Front, Never Summer, Gore, Williams Fork, Rabbit Ears ranges, Indian Peaks, and Middle Park (Clear Creek, Gilpin, Grand, Jefferson, and Park counties) for a total of 1,500 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,800 to 14,270 feet. Species of conservation concern totaled 25 documented at 73 sites. Also vouchered were 93 exotics including 18 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Arapaho National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, C. L. Porter Summer Fellowship in Botany, and the University of Wyoming.
  3. Colorado, Central, East Slope: from the Mosquito Range to the Plains. This represents the thesis project by Timothy W. Chumley. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1995, 1996, and 1997. The area encompassed the southern end of the Front Range, including the Rampart Range and Kenosha, the Tarryall and Platte River mountains, the east slope of the Mosquito Range, South Park, and the north slope of the Arkansas River Valley (Douglas, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Park, and Teller counties) for a total of 4,784 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,500 to 13,000 feet. Furthermore, Ribes niveum was rediscovered for Colorado. Collected were 18,680 specimens documenting 1,075 unique taxa. An additional 304 “historical” taxa at the RM/USFS raised the total unique taxa to 1,379. Species of conservation concern totaled 35 taxa documented at 101 sites. Also vouchered were 104 exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Pike and San Isabel National Forest, Colorado Natural Areas Program Small Grants Program, Colorado Native Plant Society, and the University of Wyoming.
  4. Comanche and Cimarron National Grasslands. This represents a thesis project by Bernadette Kuhn. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2007 and 2008. This area included the Cimarron National Grassland and Comanche National Grassland as well as adjacent private land. The study area is 1,926 mi2, spread over Baca, Otero, and Las Animas counties in Colorado and Morton County in Kansas. Elevation ranges from 3,200 to 6,444 feet. Collected were 9,281 collections representing 633 unique taxa. Exotic taxa comprised 16.5% of the flora (107 taxa) of which 16 are listed as noxious weeds. A total of 24 rare taxa were documented. In addition, two state records were added to the flora of Colorado, Astrolepis integerrima (Hook.) D. M. Benham & Windham and Digitaria pubiflora (Vasey) Wipff. Cyperus retroflexus Buckley, collected on the Cimarron National Grasslands, is an addition to the flora of Kansas. Funding was provided by the San Isabel National Forest, Edwin Payson Scholarship, and the University of Wyoming.
  5. Dolores River Drainage, Upper, and Adjacent Areas. This represents a thesis project by Lynn M. Moore. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1994, 1995, and 1996. The area encompassed the San Miguel, Rico, and La Plata mountains, Paradox, Big Gypsum, and Disappointment valleys, and adjacent mesas, canyons, and table lands (Dolores, Montezuma, Montrose, and San Miguel counties) for a total of 2,892 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,940 to 14,246 feet. Collected were 9,600 specimens documenting 976 unique taxa. The following represent species previously not reported for Colorado: Nama retrorsum and Tridens muticus var. muticus. Species of conservation concern totaled 23 documented at numerous sites. Also vouchered were 90 exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the San Juan National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado Natural Heritage Small Grants Program, and the University of Wyoming.
  6. Flat Tops, White River Plateau, and Vicinity. This represents a thesis project by James P. Vanderhorst. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1990 and 1991. The area encompassed the volcanic plateaus that make up the Flat Tops, the White River Plateau, parts of the Yampa, Williams Fork, White, and Colorado river valleys and most of the Grand Hogback (Eagle, Garfield, Moffat, Rio Blanco, and Routt counties) for a total of 2,500 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,600 to 12,493 feet. Collected were 6,610 specimens documenting 884 total unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled seven documented at 27 sites. Also vouchered were 94 exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the White River and Routt National Forests, The Nature Conservancy, Colorado Native Plant Society, L. O. Williams, and the University of Wyoming.
  7. Grand Junction and Delta Area.
  8. Gunnison Basin, Northern. This represents a thesis project by Kevin J. Taylor. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1997 and 1998. The area encompassed the Sawatch, Elk, and West Elk mountains, Fossil Ridge, Grand Mesa, and the Gunnison Uplift (Delta, Gunnison, and Montrose counties) for a total of 2,700 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,700 to 14,200 feet. Collected were 11,460 specimens documenting 999 unique taxa. An additional 195 “historical” taxa at the RM/USFS raised the total unique taxa to 1,201. Species of conservation concern totaled 24 documented at 51 sites. Also vouchered were 68 exotics including 12 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Gunnison National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado Native Plant Society, Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, and the University of Wyoming.
  9. Gunnison Basin, Southern, and the Southeastern Uncompahgre Basin. This represents a thesis project by Melanie Arnett. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. The area encompassed the Gunnison Basin, Uncompahgre Basin, San Juan, La Garita mountains, and Cochetopa Hills (Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and Saguache counties) for a total of 2,400 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,000 to 14,309 feet. Collected were 8,584 specimens documenting 958 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 37 documented at 183 sites. Also vouchered were 76 exotics including 12 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Gunnison National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado Native Plant Society, Colorado Natural Areas Program, and the University of Wyoming.
  10. Park and Sierra Madre Ranges (Colorado/ Wyoming). This represents the thesis project by Nancy Kastning. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1988, 1989, and 1990. The area encompassed the Park Range of Colorado and the Sierra Madre of Wyoming (Eagle, Grand, Jackson, and Routt counties, Colorado; Carbon County, Wyoming) for a total of 1,748 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,700 to 12,180 feet. Collected were 5,290 specimens documenting 778 unique taxa. Ipomopsis aggregata ssp. weberii represented a Wyoming record. Species of conservation concern totaled 13 documented at 25 sites. Also vouchered were numerous exotics including eight Wyoming noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Routt National Forest, Wyoming Native Plant Society, and the University of Wyoming.
    Routt National Forest. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2000 and 2001. The area encompassed the Medicine Bow and Elkhead mountains, the Never Summer, Park and Rabbit Ears ranges, and North Park (Grand, Jackson, Moffat, and Routt counties) for a total of 2,710 mi2 ranging in elevation from 7,000 to 12,951 feet. Collected were 8,421 specimens documenting 992 unique taxa. An additional 53 “historical” taxa at the RM/USFS raised the total unique taxa to 1,045. The following taxa represent species previously not reported for Colorado: Cryptantha stricta, Carex crawfordii, C. leporinella, Chamerion angustifolium var. angustifolium, Lathrocasis tenerrima, Platanthera dilitata var. dilitata, Phacelia salina, and Viola palustris. Species of conservation concern totaled 36 documented at 77 sites. Also vouchered were 68 exotics including 15 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest, Colorado State Parks, and the University of Wyoming.
  11. Roosevelt National Forest, Canyon Lakes Ranger District. This represents a thesis project by Sarah C. Nunn, a student at the University of Arkansas working through the Rocky Mountain Herbarium. Fieldwork was conducted during the summer of 2001. The area encompassed the Medicine Bow Mountains including the Rawah Wilderness of the northern Front Range (Larimer County) for a total of 1,200 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,400 to 13,000 feet. Collected were 5,205 specimens documenting 894 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 15 documented at 28 sites. Also vouchered were 80 exotics including 21 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Roosevelt National Forest, Colorado State Forest, Colorado State Forest and State Park, and the Universities of Arkansas and Wyoming.
  12. Routt National Forest. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2000 and 2001. The area encompassed the Medicine Bow and Elkhead mountains, the Never Summer, Park and Rabbit Ears ranges, and North Park (Grand, Jackson, Moffat, and Routt counties) for a total of 2,710 mi2 ranging in elevation from 7,000 to 12,951 feet. Collected were 8,421 specimens documenting 992 unique taxa. An additional 53 “historical” taxa at the RM/USFS raised the total unique taxa to 1,045. The following taxa represent species previously not reported for Colorado: Cryptantha stricta, Carex crawfordii, C. leporinella, Chamerion angustifolium var. angustifolium, Lathrocasis tenerrima, Platanthera dilitata var. dilitata, Phacelia salina, and Viola palustris. Species of conservation concern totaled 36 documented at 77 sites. Also vouchered were 68 exotics including 15 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest, Colorado State Parks, and the University of Wyoming.
  13. San Juan Mountains, Eastern, and Vicinity in Southern Colorado. This represents a thesis project by Jeanette H. Flaig. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2003 and 2004. The area encompassed the eastern San Juan Mountains (Archuleta, Conejos, Hinsdale, La Plata, Mineral, Rio Grande, Saguache, and San Juan counties) for a total of 5,000 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,280 to 14,083 feet. Collected were 11,019 specimens documenting 1,069 unique taxa. An additional 191 “historical” taxa at the RM raised total unique taxa to 1,265. Species of conservation concern totaled 46 documented at 116 sites. Also vouchered were 114 exotics including 18 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Rio Grande National Forest, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematic Botany), John Marr Fund, Myrna P. Steinkamp Memorial Fund, and the University of Wyoming.
  14. San Miguel and Lower Dolores River Drainages. This represents a thesis project by Margarette J. Lyon. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1993 and 1994. The area encompassed the Colorado Plateau-Canyonlands portion of the San Miguel National Forest (Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel counties) for a total of 2,500 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,095 to 14,071 feet. Collected were 7,163 specimens documenting 997 unique taxa. An additional 201 “historical” taxa at the RM/USFS raised the total unique taxa to 1,198. Species of conservation concern totaled 26 documented at 71 sites. Also vouchered were 68 exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management-Montrose District, Uncompahgre National Forest, The Nature Conservancy, Colorado Natural Heritage Program, and the University of Wyoming.
  15. Sawatch, West Mosquito, and West Gore Ranges and Castle Peak Area. This represents the thesis project by Emily A. Holt. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2000 and 2001. The area encompassed the Sawatch, Mosquito, and Gore ranges and the Castle Peak area (Chaffe, Eagle, Lake, and Pitkin counties) for a total of 3,300 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,200 to 14,433 feet. Collected were 9,122 specimens documenting 948 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 38 documented at 114 sites. Also vouchered were 69 exotics including 12 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the San Isabel National Forest, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematic Botany), and the University of Wyoming.
  16. Vermejo Park Ranch (New Mexico/Colorado). This represents the thesis project by Ben S. Legler. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2007 and 2008, with a short return trip in 2009. The area encompassed the Culebra Range, Park/Raton Plateau, and the Canadian and Vermejo river drainages (Colfax and Taos counties, New Mexico; Costilla and Las Animas counties, Colorado) for a total of about 912 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,800 to 12,931 feet. Collected were 7,503 specimens documenting 1,112 unique taxa. Twenty-six taxa previously not known or confirmed for New Mexico were discovered. Two species appear to be new to science. Species of conservation concern totaled 24 and documented at 88 sites. Also vouchered were 112 exotics including 21 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Vermejo Park Ranch, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematic Botany), and the University of Wyoming.