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University of Wyoming

ยป Floristics

Floristics Projects: New Mexico


Select a project from the map or list below:

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  1. Carson National Forest and Vicinity. This represents the thesis project by Jill E. Larson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2005 and 2006. The area encompassed the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Tusas Mountains, Rio Grande, Taos Plateau/San Luis Valley, Colorado Plateau, Chama Basin, and the Picuris and Taos Pueblo Indian Reservations (Colfax, Mora, Rio Arriba, Taos counties) for a total of about 3,281 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,700 to 13,161 feet. Seventeen taxa new to New Mexico were vouchered. Collected were 15,291 specimens documenting 1,229 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 24 taxa and documented at 69 sites. Also vouchered were 120 exotics including 12 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Carson National Forest, Bureau of Land Management-Taos District, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematics Botany), H. T. Northen Summer Fellowship, the Edwin Payson Scholarship, and the University of Wyoming.
  2. Philmont National Scout Ranch. This represents a summer project by R. L. Hartman (while avoiding his thesis on Wyoming Caryophyllaceae during the interim between the retirement of C. L. Porter and his replacement by J. R. and Charlotte G. Reeder from Yale University). Fieldwork was conducted primarily during the summer of 1968. The area encompassed the greater Ponil-Pueblano benchland region, Baldy Mountain and Touch Me Not Ridge to the south, Mount Phillips, Comanche, Cimarroncito, Black, Bear, and Trail mountains, Tooth-of-Time Ridge, and Urraca Mesa (Colfax County) for a total of about 210 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,500 to 12,441 feet. Fourteen taxa new to New Mexico were documented and Eriogonum aliquantum Reveal was discovered as new to science. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided the Ranch and the University of Wyoming. Besides the original set of specimens at RM, a nearly complete set of specimens is housed at TEX. Additional collecting, ~500 specimens, was done by Bruce Embury in 1991. These remain to be identified.
  3. Santa Fe National Forest and Vicinity
    (including data from Valles Caldera National Preserve).
    This represents a thesis project by Brian P. Reif. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2002, 2003, and 2004. The area encompassed the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the Jemez Mountains, Sierra Nacimiento, Caja del Rio Plateau, Glorieta Mesa, and the Santa Fe Mountains (Los Alamos, Mora, Rio Arriba, Sandoval, San Miguel, and Santa Fe counties) for a total of 3,196 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,500 to 13,000 feet. Sixteen taxa new to New Mexico were documented. Collected were 18,680 specimens documenting 1,311 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 24 taxa and documented at 51 sites. Also vouchered were 141 exotics including 14 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by Santa Fe National Forest, U.S.G.S. Biological Resources Division, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematic Botany), and the University of Wyoming. Further information on results from Valles Caldera National Preserve are provided under that project.
  4. Valles Caldera National Preserve. This represents a staff project primarily by R. L. Hartman but also B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2004. The area encompassed Valle Grande, Sierra de los Valles, Cerro de la Garita, Sierra deToledo, Cerros de los Posso, Redondo Peak, Redondo Border, and Banco Bonito and a portion of the contiguous Bandelier National Monument (Rio Arriba and Sandoval counties) for a total of 139 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,354 to 13,770 feet. Collected were 5,182 specimens documenting 562 total taxa. Betula glandulosa, Carex brunnescens subsp. brunnescens, Carex conoidea, Lepidium ramosissimum var. bourgeauanum, and Oryzopsis pungens represent taxa previously unreported for New Mexico. Species of conservation concern totaled 44 and were documented at 89 sites. Also vouchered were 68 exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the U.S.G.S. Biological Resources Division and the University of Wyoming.
  5. Vermejo Park Ranch (New Mexico/Colorado). This represents the thesis project by Ben S. Legler. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2007 and 2008, with a short return trip in 2009. The area encompassed the Culebra Range, Park/Raton Plateau, and the Canadian and Vermejo river drainages (Colfax and Taos counties, New Mexico; Costilla and Las Animas counties, Colorado) for a total of about 912 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,800 to 12,931 feet. Collected were 7,503 specimens documenting 1,112 unique taxa. Twenty-six taxa previously not known or confirmed for New Mexico were discovered. Two species appear to be new to science. Species of conservation concern totaled 24 and documented at 88 sites. Also vouchered were 112 exotics including 21 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Vermejo Park Ranch, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematic Botany), and the University of Wyoming.