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University of Wyoming

» Floristics

Floristics Projects: Wyoming


Select a project from the map or list below:

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Additional projects not shown on map:

  1. Absarokas, Northern, and northeastern Wind River Range. This represents the thesis project by David M. Rosenthal. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1996 and 1997. The area encompassed the northern Absarokas, the North Fork of the Shoshone River, and the Fitzpatrick Wilderness in Wind River Range (Park County) for a total of 2,128 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,300 to 13,400 feet. Collected were 8,177 specimens documenting 1,067 unique taxa. Two state records were vouchered Astragalus platytropis and Helictotrichon mortonianum. Species of conservation concern totaled 34 documented at 77 sites. Also vouchered were 72 exotics including three noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Shoshone National Forest and the University of Wyoming.
    Absarokas, Northern. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. E. Nelson, and independently by RM Associate Erwin F. Evert from Park Ridge, Illinois who has a summer cabin on Kitty Creek near the entrance to Yellowstone National Park. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1985, 1988, and 1989; 1978 through 2007 for Evert. The area encompassed the Northern Absarokas and the North Fork of the Shoshone River drainage (Park County) for a total of 1,578 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,000 to 12,285 feet. Collected were over 45,000 specimens, more than 35,000 of these by Evert. Numerous state records were discovered. Evert described one genus (Shoshonea) and four species (Antennaria aromatica, Lomatium attenuatum, Penstemon absarokensis, and Shoshonea pulvinata) new to science. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Shoshone National Forest and the University of Wyoming; Evert funded his own research.
  2. Absarokas, Southeastern. This represents the thesis project by Robert S. Kirkpatrick. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1983 and 1984. The area encompassed included DuNoir and Owl creeks, East Fork Wind, the South Fork Shoshone, Wood, and Greybull rivers, Carter Mountain, and Francs Peak (Park County) for a total of 1,636 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,500 to 13,140 feet. Collected were 10,500 specimens documenting 915 unique taxa. Cymopterus evertii and Ipomopsis spicata var. orchidacea were described new to science. Species of conservation concern were numerous. Also vouchered were an unknown number of exotics including noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Shoshone National Forest, L. O. Williams, and the University of Wyoming.
  3. Beartooth, Absaroka, and Gallatin Ranges (Wyoming/Montana). This represents the thesis project by Emily Elliott. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2007 and 2008. The area encompasses the “Greater Beartooth Area” (Park County, Wyoming; Carbon, Gallatin, Park, Stillwater, and Sweetgrass counties, Montana) for a total of 5,100 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,500 to 12,799 feet. Collected were 12,520 specimens. Funding is provided by the Custer, Gallatin, and Shoshone National Forests, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematic Botany), and the University of Wyoming.
    Beartooth Plateau. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1988 and 1996 and to some extent in other years. The area encompasses the Beartooth Plateau (Park County, Wyoming; Carbon County, Montana) for a total of 352 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,400 to 11,900 feet. Collected were more than 2,000 specimens. Funding is provided by the University of Wyoming.
  4. Big Horn Mountains. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1979 and 1980. The area encompassed the Big Horn Mountains including Cloud Peak Wilderness (Big Horn, Johnson, Natrona, Sheridan, and Washakie counties) for a total of 3,689 mi2 ranging in elevation from 3,800 to 13,165 feet. Collected were more than 8,000 specimens documenting 1,100 unique taxa. Eriogonum mancum was found to be a Wyoming record. Cymopterus williamsii was described as new to science and found to occur in the southern portion of the mountains. Species of conservation concern totaled six at numerous sites. Funding was provided by the Big Horn National Forest, L. O. Williams, and the University of Wyoming.
  5. Bighorn Basin. This represents the thesis project by Luanne H. Lum. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2001 and 2002. The area is from the Big Horn Mountains west to the Absaroka Range and from the Bridger/Owl Creek Mountains north to Montana (Big Horn, Hot Springs, Park, and Washakie counties) for a total of 9,429 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,400 to 9,545 feet. Collected were 7,147 specimens documenting 789 unique taxa. With the addition of 183 “historical” records at RM/USFS the number was raised to 972 total unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 20 documented at 44 sites. Also vouchered were 139 exotics including 15 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management, C. L. Porter Summer Fellowship in Botany, and the University of Wyoming..
    Bighorn Basin. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1980 and 1991. The area encompassed the Bighorn Basin (Big Horn, Hot Springs, Park, and Washakie counties) for a total of 9,429 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,400 to 9,545 feet. Collected were 9,000+ specimens documenting 687 total taxa. Cymopterus evertii, a species new to science, was first discovered near Meeteetse by David Martin. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management, L. O. Williams, and the University of Wyoming.
  6. Black Hills, Crook and Weston Counties. This represents the thesis project by Hollis Marriott. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1982, 1983, and 1984. The area encompassed the Wyoming portion of the Black Hills between the Belle Fourche and Cheyenne River drainages and including the Bear Lodge Mountains (Crook and Weston counties) for a total of 2,500 mi2 ranging in elevation from 3,500 to 6,650 feet. Collected were 11,000 specimens documenting 955 unique taxa. Fifteen state records were documented. Also vouchered were 124 exotics including 14 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Black Hills National Forest, Devils Tower Natural History Association, Paul Stock Foundation, L. O. Williams, and the University of Wyoming.
  7. Cretaceous Mountain and Hogsback Ridge. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summer of 1992. The area encompassed the Cretaceous Mountain and Hogsback Ridge (Sublette County) for a total of 173 mi2 ranging in elevation from 7,000 to 9,000 feet. Collected were 1,667 specimens documenting 355 taxa. Species of conservation concern were Astragalus drabelliformis, Oryzopsis contracta, Stipa swallenii, Townsendia nuttallii, and T. spathulata documented at 37 sites. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and two noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Mobile Exploration and Producing U.S. Inc. and the University of Wyoming.
  8. Grand Teton National Park and the Pinyon Peak Highlands. This represents the thesis project by David T. Scott. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2006 and 2007. The area encompassed Grand Teton National Park, J. D. Rockefeller Memorial Parkway, a portion of Targhee National Forest to the north in Wyoming , and the adjacent Teton Wilderness (Pinyon Peak Highlands) of Bridger-Teton National Forest (Teton County) for a total of 754 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,354 to 13,770 feet. Collected were 8,008 specimens documenting 967 unique taxa. Achillea ptarmica and Carex atrosquama represent state records. Species of conservation concern totaled 44 documented at 89 sites. Also vouchered were 71 exotics including nine noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the University of Wyoming/National Park Service program, Bridger-Teton National Forest, Dr. Thomas Ford (Aven Nelson Fellowship in Systematic Botany), and the University of Wyoming.
  9. Great Divide Basin, Green Mountains, and Upper Sweetwater Plateau. This represents the thesis project by Laura A. Welp. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1994 and 1995. The area encompassed the Great Divide Basin, Green Mountains, and Upper Sweetwater Plateau (Carbon, Sublette, and Sweetwater counties) for a total of 5,326 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,400 to 8,700 feet. Collected were 8,260 specimens documenting 877 unique taxa. An additional of 51“historical” records at RM/USFS raised the figure to 928 total unique taxa. Species of conservation concern were 14 documented at 24 sites. Also vouchered were 75 exotics including eight noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management, Wyoming Native Plant Society, and the University of Wyoming.
  10. Green River Basin, Upper. This represents the thesis project by Thomas K. Cramer. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1994 and 1995. The project encompassed the area between the Wind River and the Wyoming ranges; the southern boundary runs west from South Pass to Oyster Ridge near Kemmerer (Fremont, Lincoln, Sublette, and Sweetwater counties) for a total of 4,500 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,300 to 9,765 feet. Collected were 9,950 specimens documenting 1,047 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 26 documented at 44 sites. Also vouchered were 89 exotics including eight noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management and the University of Wyoming.
  11. Gros Ventre Mountains. This represents the thesis project by Robert W. Lichvar. Fieldwork was conducted during the summer of 1977 and some in 1978. The area encompassed was the Gros Ventre Mountains (Sublette and Teton counties) for a total of 925 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,200 to 11,645 feet. Collected were 1,600 specimens documenting 863 unique taxa. Draba borealis and Silene dichotoma documented as new to Wyoming. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and nine noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bridger-Teton National Forest, The Nature Conservancy, and the University of Wyoming.
    Gros Ventre Wilderness. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1994 and 1995. The area encompassed the Gros Ventre Wilderness (Sublette and Teton counties) for a total of 970 mi2 in mostly roadless areas ranging in elevation from 9,000 to 11,645 feet. Collected were 4,023 specimens documenting 822 unique taxa. Two taxa were newly documented for Wyoming. Species of conservation concern totaled 22 documented at 58 sites. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bridger-Teton National Forest and the University of Wyoming.
  12. Laramie Basin. This represents a staff project by B. E. Nelson and R. L. Hartman. Fieldwork has been conducted over several summers. The area encompasses the greater Laramie Valley and adjacent foothills (Albany County) for a total of 3,133 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,500 to 7,600 feet. Collected are numerous specimens documenting an unknown number of taxa. Species of conservation concern include Astragalus tridactylicus, Öonopsis wardii, Sisyrinchium pallidum, and Sphaeromeria simplex documented at numerous sites. Also vouchered are a large number of exotics and noxious weeds. Funding has been provided by the University of Wyoming.
  13. Laramie Range. This represents the thesis project by Barbara A. Packer. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1997 and 1998. The area encompassed the Laramie Range and its foothills and adjacent plains (Albany, Converse, Laramie, Natrona, and Platte counties) for a total of 3,966 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,210 to 10,272 feet. Collected were 9,168 specimens documenting 929 taxa. An additional 132 “historical” records at RM/USFS raised the figure to 1,061 total unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 14 documented at 42 sites. Also vouchered were 101 exotics including 13 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest and the University of Wyoming.
    Laramie Range. This represents a staff project by B. E. Nelson and R. L. Hartman as well as Robert D. Dorn and others. Fieldwork was conducted during several summers. The area encompassed the Laramie Mountains (Albany, Converse, Laramie, Natrona, and Platte counties) for a total of 3,966 mi2 ranging in elevation from 7,500 to 10,272 feet. Collected were an unknown number of specimens as well as taxa. Species of conservation concern include Aquilegia laramiensis, Besseya plantaginea, Salix irrorata, and Symphyotrichum porteri documented at several sites. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided independently and by the University of Wyoming.
  14. Medicine Bow Mountains. This represents the thesis project by Laura E. Lukas. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2007 and 2008. The area encompasses Coad, Kennaday, Medicine Bow (including the Snowy Range), Pennock, Sheep mountains (Albany and Carbon counties) for a total of 828 mi2 ranging in elevation from 7,800 to 12,013 feet. Collected were 10,314 specimens. Funding was provided by the Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest, Wilhelm G. and Ragnhild Solheim Scholarship, and the University of Wyoming.
    Medicine Bow Mountains. This represents the thesis project by B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summer of 1973. The area encompassed the Medicine Bow Mountains (including the Snowy Range) (Albany and Carbon counties) for a total of 828 mi2 ranging in elevation from 7,800 to 12,013 feet. Collected were 822 specimens. With “historical” records at RM the total unique taxa was 977. Species of conservation concern were not then recognized. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and five noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Payson Award and the University of Wyoming.
  15. Medicine Bow Mountains, Bureau of Land Management Lands Peripheral to. This represents a project by Laura E. Lukas, B. E. Nelson, and R. L. Hartman. Fieldwork is being conducted (summers of 2008 and 2009). The area consists of BLM lands between Laramie and Saratoga and from Rawlins south to Colorado (Albany and Carbon counties) for a total of 1473 mi2. Funding is provided by the Bureau of Land Management and the University of Wyoming.
  16. Medicine Bow Mountains, Red Mountain. This represents a research project by Linda Shoemaker, B. E. Nelson, and R. L. Hartman. Fieldwork was conducted during the summer of 1992. The area encompasses Red Mountain south of Jelm Mountain (Albany County) for a total of 12 mi2 ranging in elevation from 7,700 to 9,100 feet. Collected were 344 specimens. Also vouchered were numerous exotics including noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the University of Wyoming.
  17. Mount Leidy Highlands. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman. Fieldwork was conducted during the summer of 1995 and some in 1996. It encompassed Mount Leidy Highlands and adjacent areas (Teton County) for a total of 292 mi2 ranging in elevation from 9,000 to 10,350 feet. Collected were 3,116 specimens documenting 570 unique taxa. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bridger-Teton National Forest and the University of Wyoming.
  18. North Platte River Drainage, Upper. This represents the thesis project by Amy Roderick Taylor. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1996, 1997, and 1998. The eastern boundary is circumscribed by the Laramie Range and a line from Mills to Waltman in the north. The western boundary includes the Sierra Madre, Great Divide Basin, and Beaver Rim whereas Saratoga Valley represents its southern extent (Albany, Carbon, Fremont, and Natrona counties) for a total of 7,000 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,100 to 11,162 feet. Collected were 10,446 specimens documenting 1,047 unique taxa. Penstemon haydenii and Robinia neomexicana var. neomexicana were found new to Wyoming. Species of conservation concern totaled 26 documented at 104 sites. Also vouchered were 101 exotics including 18 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management, Wyoming Native Plant Society, and the University of Wyoming.
  19. Owl Creek & Bridger Mountains. This represents a project by B. E. Nelson, R. L. Hartman, Robin Jones, and others. Fieldwork was conducted during the 1980s and early 1990s. The area encompasses Owl Creek and Bridger mountains (Fremont, Hot Springs, and Park counties) for a total of 1,340 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,300 to 10,800 feet. Collected were 4,000 specimens. Funding was provided by the University of Wyoming.
  20. Park and Sierra Madre Ranges (Colorado/ Wyoming). This represents the thesis project by Nancy Kastning. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1988, 1989, and 1990. The area encompassed the Park Range of Colorado and the Sierra Madre of Wyoming (Eagle, Grand, Jackson, and Routt counties, Colorado; Carbon County, Wyoming) for a total of 1,748 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,700 to 12,180 feet. Collected were 5,290 specimens documenting 778 unique taxa. Ipomopsis aggregata ssp. weberii represented a Wyoming record. Species of conservation concern totaled 13 documented at 25 sites. Also vouchered were numerous exotics including eight Wyoming noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Routt National Forest, Wyoming Native Plant Society, and the University of Wyoming.
  21. Powder River Basin, Southern, and the Eastern Grasslands. This represents a staff project by B. E. Nelson and R. L. Hartman. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1993, 1994, and 1995. The area encompassed plains, grasslands, and breaks (Converse, Goshen, Natrona, Niobrara, and Platte counties) for a total of 19,772 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,100 to 6,100 feet. Collected were 12,617 specimens documenting 958 unique taxa. State records included: Eleocharis parvula, Eragrostis spectabilis, Juncus articulatus, Scirpus saximontanus, and Spiranthes diluvialis. Species of conservation concern were 15 documented at 66 sites. Of special note was the federally listed threatened species Spiranthes diluvialis collected at two sites which represented a state record. Also vouchered were numerous exotics including 17 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management and the University of Wyoming.
    Powder River Basin. This represents the thesis project by the late Keith H. Dueholm. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1978 and 1979. The area encompassed was the basin from the Black Hills west to the Big Horn Mountains and the Laramie Range north to Montana; Great Plains grasslands, Rochelle Hills with ponderosa pine, and scoria outcrops (Campbell, Converse, Crook, Johnson, Natrona, Niobrara, Sheridan, and Weston counties) for a total of 19,772 mi2 ranging in elevation from 3,500 to 6069 feet. Collected were 13,000+ specimens documenting 900 total unique taxa. Also vouchered were numerous exotics, including 14 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Rocky Mountain Institute of Energy and Environment, University of Wyoming. Thesis never completed.
  22. Snake and Yellowstone Rivers, Headwaters of the. This represents the thesis project by Neil Snow. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1987 and 1988. The area encompassed the eastern Teton Wilderness, Washakie Wilderness, and extreme southeastern Yellowstone National Park (Fremont, Park, and Teton counties) for a total of 1,255 mi2 of mostly roadless area ranging in elevation from 5,950 to 12,156 feet. Collected were 5,600 specimens documenting 891 unique taxa. Much additional work is needed at high elevations. Species of conservation concern were not mentioned. Also vouchered were 62 exotics including eight noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Shoshone and Bridger-Teton National Forests, a Payson Scholarship, the Wyoming Native Plant Society, and the University of Wyoming.
  23. Targhee National Forest and Vicinity. This represents the thesis project by the late Stuart Markow. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1991 and 1992. The area encompassed the Snake River, Big Hole, and west slope of the Teton ranges of Wyoming and Idaho, Island Park, Centennial Ridge, and Southern Beaverhead Range, Idaho (including parts of Lincoln and Teton counties, Wyoming; Bonneville, Clark, Fremont, Lemhi, Madison, and Teton counties, Idaho) for a total of 2,885 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,600 to 11,383 feet. Collected were 13,442 specimens documenting 1,104 unique taxa. Lithospermum arvense represented a new record for Wyoming. Species of conservation concern totaled 21 documented at 31 sites. Also vouchered were 99 exotics including 15 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Targhee National Forest, The Nature Conservancy, and the University of Wyoming.
  24. Thunder Basin National Grassland and Vicinity. This represents the thesis project by Peter J. Ebertowski. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2002 and 2003. The area encompassed Great Plains grasslands, river drainages, and breaks (Campbell, Converse, Crook, Niobrara, and Weston counties) for a total of 8,803 mi2 ranging in elevation from 3,500 to 5,700 feet. Collected were 10,013 specimens documenting 673 unique taxa. An additional of 128 “historical” records at RM/USFS raised the figure to 801 total unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled ten documented at 35 sites. Also vouchered were 110 exotics including 15 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest and the University of Wyoming.
  25. Wind River Basin and Adjacent Areas. This represents the thesis project by June Haines. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1985 and 1986. The area encompassed the eastern foothills of the Wind River Mountains, part of the Granite Mountain Uplift, and the Sheep Mountain Anticline (Carbon, Fremont, and Natrona counties) for a total of 5,168 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,400 to 9,545 feet. Collected were 6,685 specimens documenting 885 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern were not tabulated. Also vouchered were 81 exotics including seven noxious weeds. Funding was provided by The Nature Conservancy and the University of Wyoming.
  26. Wind River Range, East Slope of the, and Vicinity. This represents the thesis project by Robert T. Massatti. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 2005 and 2006. The area encompassed was the Fitzpatrick Wilderness to the north and the remainder of the Shoshone National Forest to the south of the Wind River Indian Reservation (Fremont County) for a total of 1,198 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,000 to 13,804 feet. Collected were 9,534 specimens documenting 1,056 unique taxa. State records were Carex lenticularis var. dolia and Festuca viviparoidea ssp. krajinae. Species of conservation concern totaled 44 documented at 166 sites. Also vouchered were 55 exotics including nine noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Shoshone National Forest and the University of Wyoming.
    Absarokas, Northern, and northeastern Wind River Range. This represents the thesis project by David M. Rosenthal. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1996 and 1997. The area encompassed the northern Absarokas, the North Fork of the Shoshone River, and the Fitzpatrick Wilderness in Wind River Range (Park County) for a total of 2,128 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,300 to 13,400 feet. Collected were 8,177 specimens documenting 1,067 unique taxa. Two state records were vouchered Astragalus platytropis and Helictotrichon mortonianum. Species of conservation concern totaled 34 documented at 77 sites. Also vouchered were 72 exotics including three noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Shoshone National Forest and the University of Wyoming.
  27. Wind River Range, West Slope of the. This represents the thesis project by Walter Fertig. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1990 and 1991. The area encompassed the west slope of the Wind River Range (Fremont, Sublette, and Teton counties) for a total of 1,812 mi2 ranging in elevation from 7,500 to 13,804 feet. Collected were 13,274 specimens documenting 988 unique taxa. An additional of 46 “historical” records at RM/USFS raised the figure to 1,034 total unique taxa. Chrysanthemum parthenium, Coronilla varia, and Erigeron lanatus proved new to Wyoming. Species of conservation concern totaled 27 documented at 70 sites. Also vouchered were 76 exotics including six noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bridger-Teton National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, Wilhelm G. and Ragnhild Solheim Scholarship, and the University of Wyoming.
  28. Wyoming and Salt River Ranges and Kemmerer Resource Area. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. L. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The area encompassed the two mountain ranges (excluding Willow Creek area) west to Idaho and and the Kemmerer Resource Area of the Bureau of Land Management to the south (Lincoln, Sublette, and Teton counties) for a total of 2,957 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,400 to 11,363 feet. Collected were 19,267 specimens documenting 1,087 unique taxa. Silene douglasii represents state record. Species of conservation concern totaled 34 documented at 130 sites. Also vouchered were numerous exotics and a number of noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bridger-Teton National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management, and the University of Wyoming.
  29. Wyoming Range, Willow Creek. This represents a staff project by R. L. Hartman and B. E. Nelson. Fieldwork was conducted during the summer of 1990. The area encompassed the Willow Creek Drainage at the north end of the Wyoming Range (Lincoln and Teton counties) for a total of 80 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,000 to 10,579 feet. Collected were 1,820 specimens documenting 532 unique taxa. Four species of conservation concern were documented at seven sites. Also vouchered were an unknown number of exotics and noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bridger-Teton National Forest and the University of Wyoming.
  30. Wyoming, Basins and Mountains of Southwest, and the Uinta Mountains of Utah. This represents the thesis project by Charmaine Refsdal Delmatier. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1994 and 1995. The area encompassed the Lower Green River Basin, Bear River drainage, north slope of the Uintas, Browns Park (Lincoln, Sweetwater, and Uinta counties Wyoming; Daggett, Rich, and Summit counties, Utah) for a total of 6,458 mi2 ranging in elevation from 5,400 to 13,528 feet. Collected were 8,855 specimens documenting 1,175 unique taxa. An additional of 128 Wyoming and 310 Utah “historical” records at RM/USFS raised the figure to 1,613 total unique taxa. Ten species previously unknown from Wyoming were discovered. Cymopterus constancei was described as new to science. Species of conservation concern totaled 56 documented at 80 sites. Also vouchered were 81 exotics including ten noxious weeds for Wyoming. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management, Ashley National Forest, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and the University of Wyoming.
  31. Wyoming, South-Central. This represents the thesis project by Beth A. (Ward) Burkhart. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1996 and 1997. The area encompassed the Washakie Basin, Rock Springs Uplift, and the Lower Green River Basin (Carbon, Fremont, Sublette, Sweetwater counties) for a total of 6,524 mi2 ranging in elevation from 6,100 to 9,720 feet. Collected were 9,265 specimens documenting 858 unique taxa. Species of conservation concern totaled 20 documented at 44 sites. Also vouchered were 88 exotics including 11 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management and the University of Wyoming.
  32. Wyoming, Southeast. This represents a staff project by B. E. Nelson with help from student Kelly Hughes. Fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1998, 1999, and 2001. The area encompassed the Cheyenne-Denver Basin and Laramie Plains (Albany, Carbon, Goshen, Laramie, and Platte counties) for a total of 14,437 mi2 ranging in elevation from 4,100 to 7,400 feet. Collected were 8,496 specimens documenting 808 unique taxa. The following state records were discovered: Asclepias engelmannia, Chenopodium incanum var. incanum, Juncus gerardii, and Phaseolus vulgaris. Species of conservation concern totaled 25 documented at 50 sites. Also vouchered were numerous exotics including 16 noxious weeds. Funding was provided by the Bureau of Land Management and the University of Wyoming.